How to Eat like a Yogi #2: Go at your own pace

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Hope you all liked the previous post from the new ‘How to Eat like a Yogi’ posts! If you haven’t seen it, have a look here.

Our second little tip relates closely to the first, because it is still about listening to your body.

#2: Go at your own pace

We are all constructed differently, which means  we learn at different speeds and some may be able to achieve more while others less.

Important thing is to understand there’s no problem with learning faster or slower than others, it doesn’t make you worse or more special either way.

Sometimes we might not be aware, but certain words can make children anxious about what they eat, for example…

When little Tommy hears Aunt Sally say: “My girl started eating cabbage when she was two and

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now she eats all kinds of vegetables”, he might feel that he is worse off by not liking cabbage even though he’s already 4 years old.

Focus on the positives and the improvements. For example, talk about how little Tommy originally was scared of fruits but now strawberries and apples are his best friend.

OR, talk about something else (such as school, friends, their favourite TV show). Remember, we don’t want to make too much of a big deal out of food.

Let children develop at their own pace, and try to refrain from comparing two children. Every child is unique and should be treasured for who they are 🙂

-R.L.

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How to Eat like a Yogi #1: Listen to your body

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Firstly, I must state that this is not a ‘detox’ or ‘diet’ blog post. I’m trying to share a way of approaching food which I have learned from my yoga practice.

What is a yogi? 

A yogi is a person who practices yoga.

So, how do you eat like a yogi? 

In short, eating like a yogi means approaching food in a relaxed and positive manner.

No strict guidelines like you MUST NOT eat something, or HAVE TO eat something.

I’ll be splitting some main points into several posts, so you can slowly think about them and maybe apply them in your family to see if they work out.

#1 Listen to your body

In yoga, there is no right or wrong. Because the person next to you can do a handstand, it

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doesn’t mean you should be pressured to do so in any way.

Teach your children to listen to their internal cues, such as how hungry they are, when they are full, whether they are ready for a new food. If Max, whose sitting next to your child likes to eat carrots and beans, he/she by no means needs to be pressured to eat those foods too.

Everyone is unique and will feel different everyday. Maybe today you can do the splits, but tomorrow your muscles might not feel comfortable to do so, and that is OK.

Today, little Tommy may feel like potatoes, and tomorrow he may not even want to see them. Tell your child that it’s OK and it’s good that he is learning to listen to his body.

Remember that it’s alright if your child’s preferences change around and their hungry today and not tomorrow. The best skill they can learn is to listen to their body and do what they feel is right.

-R.L.